Adventure Is Out There

Adventure Is Out There

Story By: Taylor Onderko

Senior Tansu Philip is many things, like an entertainment writer, radio talk show host, and a food blogger.

One thing she isn’t, is boring.

“I love all types of food and have yet to go a single day without indulging at least once,” said Philip.

Like a lot of Chapman students, she’s determined to seek adventure.

Whether it be through trying new foods, volunteering, or taking a day hike; studies have shown that it’s important for a student’s sanity to go out and explore every once in awhile.

The Psychology and Education: An Interdisciplinary Journal has shown that college freshmen often internalize their boredom, creating an overall sense of loneliness, helplessness, and social isolation.

Forbes suggests the solution to this: Be more adventurous.

“Challenge is the key to staying engaged. Your brain wants to be used. Ask for new responsibilities. Take on projects and tasks that push you outside your comfort zone,” said Forbes contributor Chrissy Scivicque.

Courtney Mendoza, the vice president of Active Minds at Chapman, believes engaging in activities you’re interested in will help with alleviating boredom, and help you staying involved.

“I think finding what you’re passionate about helps you to get involved with anything, and then the rest falls into place,” said Mendoza.

Your Tastebuds Want in on the Action

You can spice up your life by spicing up your food.

Tasting with Tansu blogger,Tansu Philip has discovered multiple restaurants in Orange County and even worldwide for you and your friends to try.

“I won’t bother with food that isn’t well-made. Sounds obnoxious, but it’s the truth,” said Philip.

Philip is a strong believer in quality over quantity. This passion has helped her discover restaurants all over Orange County that are worth visiting; like XA Sweet and Savory Cafe in Orange.

“XA Cafe is really unique because it accommodates people with food allergies or preferences, without being horrifically boring. The owner has mastered the art of combining healthy food with actual flavor and taste,” said Philip.

If Italian food is what your tastebuds desire, Philip suggests you try Mama D’s in Newport Beach. Although it isn’t relatively close to Chapman; its atmosphere, impeccable service and decently priced, delicious food is worth the commute, she said, noting:

“They have a winning combo every time.”

Click Here For More Great Restaurant Options

Pay it Forward

MJ Nelson believes that sometimes all the adventure you need is knowing you made someone’s day.

“The most rewarding experience in volunteering is building relationships with the volunteers and the people that you are helping,” said senior business administration major, MJ Nelson.

Chapman offers a plethora of volunteer opportunities to choose from. From interterm trips to joining organizations on campus, there seems to be something for everybody, even Nelson.

By taking advantage of one of Chapman’s interterm volunteer opportunities in New Orleans, Nelson was able to work alongside a group of students to rebuild houses that had been destroyed during Hurricane Katrina. During the trip he had made connections with the not only the other students, but the owners of the home they worked on.

“It was sad to leave the house because there was so much work still to be done, but the fact that we still made a difference was comforting,” said Nelson.

Chapman and Orange County as a whole makes it so easy to get involved with civic engagement.

There are organizations on campus that focus solely on the betterment of the community, such as, Active Minds and Circle K. Even Greek life offers philanthropic opportunities for the community to participate in.

Joining an organization that has members with the same ideals and values as you is a great way to get excited about giving back.

“Volunteering for causes you care about with other people with the same passion is always motivating,” said Mendoza.

Take a Breath of Fresh Air

Lucky for you, Mother Nature blessed Orange County with beautiful scenery and worthwhile hikes.

Strap on those hiking boots, take a break and go explore.

“It's about experiencing the experience, not looking the part or promoting yourself,” said Chris Thatcher, senior economics and environmental science major.

Thatcher is an experienced hiker. Last spring he embarked on a journey alone through the Trans Catalina Trail. Although he doesn’t advocate for beginner hikers to go solo, he does suggest hiking through Laguna Canyon and Crystal Cove with a friend, both of which are great spots to sit and watch the sunset over the ocean.

“A little closer to Orange, I usually stick to one of the regional parks (Peter's Canyon, Santiago Oaks and Irvine). Not so great in terms of scenery, but they're nice places to see the native ecology of the area,” said Thatcher.

According to Thatcher, if you’re able to venture farther away from Orange to experience a memorable hike, Joshua Tree, Mt.Baldy, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains are the places to see.

Click Here For More Hiking Tips 

“I have a two hour rule for cool stuff. I'm willing to drive two-ish hours for something to get away from the burbs,” said junior studio art major, Sophia Nielsen.

Crystal Cove National Park

Nielsen, a native Oregonian, grew up in the outdoors. As a young girl she was excited to tag along on outdoor adventures with her dad and brother, who are both Eagle Scouts.

“I go out to Joshua Tree a good bit to scramble, but black star canyon is really great for a close [hike],” said Nielsen.

Hiking can be a good outlet for relieving anxiety and releasing bottled-up energy.

According to the American Hiking Society, “ If adrenaline…isn’t released from the body, it accumulates, causing muscle tension and feelings of anxiety. Walking releases this adrenaline. Results showed immediate decreases in tension and anxiety after walking.”

Good news: hiking also makes you happy.

The American Hiking Society also reported that “endorphins released by your body during a walking workout can lift your spirits…”

 

Resources

You can read more about the correlation between lack of motivation and internalized boredom in the Psychology and Education: An Interdisciplinary Journal article titled “When Boredom Causes Distress: A Qualitative Study Of Internalized Boredom.”

To help you cope, Psychology Todays article titled “6 Ways for Coping with Boredom” offers insight on how to reframe situations to eliminate that boredom.

If hiking and volunteering interest you, both the American Hiking Society and World Volunteer Web explain the benefits of engaging in these activities.

There are so many resources on the internet or at your school that can offer guidance.

So, before your course load makes you pull your hair out, take a deep breath and lift your spirits by spending time with friends, a good meal or Mother Nature.

Tasting with Tansu

Tansu has compiled a few must-try restaurants in the area!

 

Xa Sweet and Savory Cafe:

424 S Main St, Ste C Orange CA 92868 

 

Poke District:

1924 N Tustin St, Orange, CA 92865

 

Pokinometry:

184 S Harbor Blvd, Anaheim, CA 92805

 

Mama Ds Italian Kitchen:

3012 Newport Blvd, Newport Beach, CA 92663

 

Honda-Ya:

556 El Camino Real, Tustin, CA 92780

 

The Boiling Crab:

1500 W Macarthur Blvd

Santa Ana, CA 92704

For more guidance on where to eat, check out Tansu Philips’ food blog:

http://tastingwithtansu.com

5 Hiking Safety Tips from Chris Thatcher

1. Bring PLENTY of water. My rule for hot days in CA is absolute minimum a quart per hour you      expect to be out. Dehydration is the single largest factor in most emergency situations I have been in.

2. Be aware that vertical distance is going to make a trip much more difficult than horizontal distance, and that altitude is both more demanding and dehydrating.

3. Going alone- it's not the safest idea, so if you're going solo, make sure to be even more aware of the normal risks.

4. Leave no trace. This basically means, leave the outdoors as they were when you arrived. Don’t litter.

5. Stick to designated trails- failing to do so ruins the local ecosystem.

 



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